TTS Coupe '09

 

The Audi TT is a two-door compact sports car manufactured by Audi Hungaria Motor Kft. in Győr, Hungary, since 1998, for the German automaker and Volkswagen Group subsidiary AUDI AG.

The Audi TT is now in its second generation — and both generations have been available in two car body styles; as a 2+2 Coupé (TT-C), or two-seater Roadster (TT-R). They have been built on consecutive generations of the Volkswagen Group A platform, starting with the A4 (PQ34). As a result of this platform-sharing, the Audi TT has identical suspension layouts as its related platform-mates; this includes a front-mounted transversely orientated engine, front-wheel drive or quattro permanent four-wheel drive system, and fully independent front suspension using MacPherson struts.

The styling of the Audi TT began in the spring of 1994 at the Volkswagen Group Design Center in California. The TT was first shown as a concept car at the 1995 Frankfurt Motor Show. The design is credited to J Mays and Freeman Thomas, with Hartmut Warkuss, Peter Schreyer, Martin Smith and Romulus Rost contributing to the award-winning interior design.

TT Mk2 (Typ 8J, 2006-)

A preview of the second-generation TT was provided in the form of the Audi Shooting Brake concept car, shown at the Tokyo Motor Show in 2005. This concept was an insight into the new TT, but featured angular styling, and a "shooting brake" two-door hatchback body style.

Audi revealed the second-generation TT, internal designation Typ 8J, on 6 April 2006. It is constructed on the Volkswagen Group A5 (PQ35) platform, and uses aluminium in the front bodypanels, and steel in the rear, to enhance its near-neutral front-to-rear weight distribution. It is available in front-wheel drive or 'quattro' four-wheel drive layout, and is again offered as a 2+2 Coupé, and as a two-seater Roadster. Compared to the previous generation, this new variant is five inches longer and three inches wider than its predecessor. Factory production commenced during August 2006.

8J powertrain

The powertrain options initially only included petrol engines, which consist of either one of two inline four cylinder engines - the all-new 1.8 litre EA888 Turbocharged Fuel Stratified Injection (TFSI) (available initially only in Germany, later elsewhere from mid 2009), or the more common and established EA113-variant 2.0 litre TFSI. The Fuel Stratified Injection (FSI) technology was derived from the Audi Le Mans endurance race cars, and offers improved fuel efficiency as well as an increased power output and cleaner emissions. The 3.2 litre 'V6' badged VR6 engine is carried over from the previous generation, and this engine was also available in the Canadian model. 2.0 TFSI quattro models, with the latest EA888 engine, became available in 2009 model year.

A six-speed manual transmission is standard, with the six-speed Direct-Shift Gearbox (now called S-TRONIC on all Audi models) as an option for all but 1.8 litre engine. quattro on-demand four-wheel drive, again using the Haldex Traction clutch is available - standard on V6 models, but was not available on 1.8 TFSI.

8J suspension and other features

Like all its PQ35 platform-mates, the new 8J TT now has a multi-link fully independent rear suspension to complement the front independent suspension. The entire suspension system can be enhanced with Audi's new active suspension, "Audi Magnetic Ride", available as an option. This is based on Delphi's MagneRide, which uses magneto rheological dampers (this means that an electronic control unit for the suspension will automatically adjust its damping properties depending on the current road conditions and driving manner).

The new TT also features an revised rear spoiler; which automatically extends at speeds greater than 120 kilometres per hour (75 mph), and retracts again below 80 kilometres per hour (50 mph). The spoiler can also be manually controlled by the driver via a switch on the dash.

TTS quattro

At the 2008 North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) in Detroit, Audi released the first Audi "S" model of the TT range - the Audi TTS quattro, with a heavily revised 2.0 TFSI engine. The cylinder block, cylinder head and the fuel injectors have all been modified from the base 2.0 TFSI engine (ID: CDL). Together with other modifications, this engine produces a DIN-rated motive power output of 200 kilowatts (272 PS; 268 bhp), and generates a torque turning force of 350 newton metres (258 ft·lbf) from 2,500 to 5,000 rpm.

It is available with a choice of either a six-speed close-ratio manual transmission, or a six-speed 'S tronic' transmission. In the United States, the S tronic gearbox will be the only available transmission. Like all Audi "S" models, it is only available with quattro four-wheel drive as standard.

The suspension is lowered by 10 millimetres (0.4 in) over the standard models, and includes "Audi Magnetic Ride" as standard and a new two-stage sports-biased Electronic Stability Program (ESP). Radially ventilated front disc brakes are clamped by a single-piston gloss black caliper emblazened with a bold TTS logo, and a lap timer is prominent in the centre of the instrument cluster. 9Jx18" '5-parallel-spoke' design alloy roadwheels are standard, with 245/40 ZR18 high performance tyres. 19" '5-spoke star' wheels and tyres are optional. The exterior has some changes over the standard model - with a TTS body styling: with redesigned front, with larger air intakes, redesigned rear bumper, side sill extensions, and four exhaust tailpipes.

Official performance figures for the sprint from standstill to 100 kilometres per hour (62.1 mph) for the TTS Coupé can be reached in 5.4 seconds, with the Roadster two-tenths slower at 5.6 seconds. Top speed is electronically limited to 250 kilometres per hour (155 mph).

Audi UK offered eight TTS cars for official use by the race organisers at the 2008 Isle of Man TT motorcycle races.

The car went on sale in the USA at November 2008.